If you have diabetes, your doctor might suggest Admelog as a treatment option for you. It’s a prescription drug used to manage blood sugar levels in:

Admelog comes as a liquid solution given as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under your skin) or an intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into your vein given over time). If you and your doctor determine that Admelog is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely use it long term.

The active ingredient in Admelog is insulin lispro. (An active ingredient is what makes a drug work.) Admelog is a follow-on drug (biosimilar) to Humalog, which is a biologic drug made from living cells. (Follow-on drugs are often used to treat the same or very similar conditions as their parent drug.)

For more information about Admelog, including details about its uses, see this in-depth article.

Admelog can cause mild to serious side effects. Continue reading to learn more.

Mild to serious side effects may occur during Admelog treatment. The drug has been reported to have some side effects.

The side effects explained section is where you can learn more about this side effect.

These are just a few of the more common Admelog insulin side effects reported in studies. Side effects can vary depending on factors such as the condition the drug is being used to treat and how the drug is given.

For example, hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) was the most common side effect in both people with type 1 diabetes and people with type 2 diabetes. And upper respiratory infection (URI) and nasopharyngitis (a cold) were commonly reported side effects in people with type 1 diabetes.

Injection site reaction, lipodystrophy, and cutaneous amyloidosis are side effects of many drugs that are given as an injection or infusion. The admelog can be given as:

If you want to reduce the risk of injection side effects, you should rotation your pump injection sites.

“Admelog treatment can cause some side effects, so please be aware of that. They don’t happen to everyone. There are sections about the possible side effects of this drug.”

Mild side effects may be caused by admelog. There are examples that have been reported with this drug.

The side effects explained section is where you can learn more about this side effect.

“These side effects should be temporary. Some may be easy to manage. If you have any symptoms that bother you, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Unless your doctor recommends it, don’t stop using Admelog.”

Admelog may cause mild side effects other than the ones listed above. See Admelog’s prescribing information for details.

Note: After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves a drug, it tracks side effects of the medication. If you’d like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Admelog, visit MedWatch.

Mild side effects with Admelog are more common than serious side effects. There have been some serious side effects reported with this drug.

The side effects explained section is where you can learn more about this side effect.

If you develop serious side effects from Admelog, you should call your doctor. If the side effects seem life threatening or you think you have a medical emergency, immediately call the emergency number.

Get answers to questions about Admelog.

Does Admelog cause long-term side effects?

Admelog isn’t known to cause long-term side effects. But Admelog is very similar to the biologic drug Humalog (a type of insulin). And long-term insulin use has been linked to side effects such as lipodystrophy (changes in skin thickness near the injection site) and weight gain. To learn more about these side effects, see the “Side effects explained” section below.

In some studies, there were reports of heart problems, cancer, and death in people with diabetes who took insulin long term. But it’s important to note that people in studies may be at different stages in their diabetes management. Or the severity of their conditions may differ. They may also have other factors that caused or contributed to their heart problems or cancer. (For example, weight gain is a side effect of insulin use and is also a risk factor for heart disease.)

How do Admelog’s side effects compare to those for Humalog?

The side effects of Admelog and Humalog are similar. Admelog is a follow-on drug (biosimilar) to Humalog, which is a biologic drug made from living cells. (Follow-on drugs are often used to treat the same or very similar conditions as their parent drug.) The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers the two drugs to have nearly the same level of safety and effectiveness.

There are side effects of Admelog and Humalog.

The side effects explained section is where you can learn more about this side effect.

The side effects of Admelog and Humalog can be compared by your doctor or pharmacist.

What can increase the risk of injection site reaction?

Injecting Admelog in the same site can increase your risk of injection site reaction. This can include pain, swelling, It was itching., and redness or skin discoloration. These are usually considered mild side effects and will typically go away in a few days. But if they don’t clear up or are bothersome, talk with your doctor.

Changes to the fat underneath the skin are one of the reactions at the injection site. Repeated injections into the same area can cause this. It can cause your skin to look different. Changes to your body can affect your Admelog dose. Tell your doctor if you have any changes to your skin.

Change the site where you inject your dose to help reduce reactions. If you use a pen with ainsulin, you should throw it away after 28 days.

Talk to your doctor about Admelog, which can help prevent injection site reactions.

Admelog may cause some side effects.

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a common side effect of Admelog. The drug helps lower your blood sugar, but sometimes it can get too low during treatment. This side effect can be sudden, and in some people, the symptoms can change over time. Severe low blood sugar can be life threatening.

Low blood sugar can cause symptoms.

Seizure and loss of consciousness can also be symptoms of severe low blood sugar.

Admelog is used with other drugs that may increase the risk of this side effect. These drugs lower blood sugar.

To learn more about the drugs that Admelog may interact with, see this in-depth article. And be sure to talk with your doctor about other drugs that can increase your risk of low blood sugar while using Admelog.

What might help

If your diabetes is being treated with Admelog, your doctor may have you check your blood sugar level several times each day with a glucometer. (This is a medical device that measures blood sugar.) How often you test depends on the type of diabetes you have and the treatment plan recommended by your doctor.

If you notice signs that your blood sugar is low, you should consume at least 15 grams (g) of fast-acting carbohydrates. This could be hard or soft candy, 4 ounces (1/2 cup) of juice or non-diet soda, or 1 tablespoon of honey. Wait 15 minutes, and then check your blood sugar again. If it’s still not going up, consume another 15 g of carbohydrates. Repeat this process until your blood sugar level increases to at least 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).

When it is considered a medical emergency, it is important to talk with your doctor about the symptoms of hypoglycemics. If you or someone you know has symptoms that are severe, you should call the emergency number.

Hypokalemia

It’s possible to have hypokalemia (low potassium level in your blood) during treatment with Admelog. While it was not reported how often it occurred in studies, hypokalemia can be a dangerous and even life threatening side effect.

The risk of hypokalemia can increase if you have certain other conditions, such as liver or kidney problems. If you have conditions that can affect your potassium level, your doctor is likely to monitor you closely during your treatment.

If you drink alcohol, you should talk to your doctor. Consuming large amounts of alcohol can affect your potassium levels.

Admelog can reduce your potassium level. Some examples are included.

Symptoms of low potassium include:

What might help

Before starting Admelog, discuss your health history with your doctor and ask about drug interactions that are possible with other medications you take. Call your doctor right away if you have symptoms of low potassium. You’ll likely need to be treated in a hospital to restore your potassium levels.

Respiratory infections

Upper respiratory infection (URI) and nasopharyngitis (a cold) were common side effects in people with type 1 diabetes in Admelog studies.

Respiratory infections include:

The back of the throat and the nose are swollen when a cold is present.

What might help

Talk with your doctor if you develop a respiratory infection during Admelog treatment. They may recommend some over-the-counter (OTC) medications to help manage your symptoms. Before taking other drugs, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Some OTC medications, such as Sudafed (pseudoephedrine), can possibly affect your blood sugar levels.

Weight gain

Weight gain is a possible side effect of insulin therapy. Admelog is a man-made drug very similar to the biologic drug Humalog (insulin lispro) and can cause weight gain. If you gain or lose weight during treatment with Admelog, your dose may need to be adjusted.

If you gain a lot of weight, your body may be retaining fluids that can be dangerous.

If you have sudden weight gain during treatment with Admelog, call your doctor right away. This is especially important if you take certain other diabetes drugs such as Avandia (rosiglitazone) and Actos (pioglitazone). In some people, thiazolidinediones used together with Admelog can cause heart failure.

What might help

Be sure to use Admelog as your doctor prescribes. You should also monitor your blood sugar level throughout your treatment. Doing so can help reduce large swings in the level of sugar in your blood, which can help you manage your weight. Other ways to manage your weight include:

  • The amount of calories you consume each day is important.
  • exercising.
  • Eating smaller meals throughout the day.

Lipodystrophy and cutaneous amyloidosis

Injecting Admelog under the skin at the same spot over a long period can cause the fat under the skin to change. This is called lipodystrophy (changes in skin thickness near the injection site) and can cause your skin to look pitted or thick.

Cutaneous amyloidosis has also been seen in studies of this drug. These are abnormal lumps in the skin from repeated injections into the same spot.

Both of these conditions can affect how your body absorbs the drug. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can occur if you inject into these sites. And hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) can happen if you suddenly change your injection site to a different, unaffected area of skin.

What might help

The risk of lipodystrophy and cutaneous amyloidosis can be reduced by rotating your injection site. Talk to your doctor about where to inject your Admelog dose and how to use injection sites.

Allergic reaction

Admelog can cause an allergic reaction in some people. Mild to serious symptoms can be present.

What might help

If you have mild symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as a mild There is a There is a rash.., call your doctor right away. They may suggest a treatment to manage your symptoms. Examples include:

  • an over-the-counter oral antihistamine, such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine)
  • A product that is applied to the skin.

If your doctor confirms you have an allergic reaction to Admelog, they will decide if you should continue using it.

If you have a severe allergic reaction, you should call the emergency number. These symptoms could be life threatening and need immediate medical care.

If your doctor confirms you have had a serious allergic reaction to Admelog, they may have you switch to a different treatment.

Keeping track of side effects

Take notes on any side effects you are having during your Admelog treatment. You can share this information with your doctor. This is helpful when you are starting to use a combination of treatments.

Side effect notes can include things.

  • When you had the side effect, what dose of the drug was taking?
  • How soon did you experience the side effect?
  • What are your symptoms?
  • How did it affect your daily activities?
  • What other drugs were you taking?
  • Other information is important to you.

Sharing notes with your doctor will help them understand how Admelog affects you. If needed, they can use this information to adjust your treatment plan.

If you have a medical condition that affects your health, admelog may not be right for you. Before starting Admelog, talk to your doctor about your health history. Some factors to consider.

Low potassium. Admelog can cause hypokalemia (a low level of potassium in your blood). Certain other health conditions and medications may also lower potassium, which can increase your risk of hypokalemia while using Admelog. Serious heart problems can occur from low potassium. If you’re at risk of having low potassium, your doctor will monitor you closely during your treatment. If your potassium level gets too low, you may need to have it treated in a hospital. (See “Hypokalemia” under “Side effects explained” above for more information.)

Use with thiazolidinediones. Thiazolidinediones are a group of drugs that help manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. If used together with Admelog, there is a risk of fluid buildup in the body and serious heart problems. Your doctor may reduce your dosage or have you stop Admelog treatment if you develop symptoms of heart failure. (See “Weight gain” in the “Side effects explained” above for more information.)

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Admelog or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely recommend a different medication for you. Ask them what other treatments might be better options for you.

Current hypoglycemia. Admelog lowers the level of sugar in your blood, and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) can be a side effect. Severe hypoglycemia, which can be life threatening, can occur if you already have low blood sugar and use Admelog. Be sure to talk with your doctor about the risks of Admelog treatment and how to know when low blood sugar is a medical emergency. (See “Side effects explained” above for more information.)

Alcohol and Admelog

“You should not drink alcohol during treatment. Alcohol can affect how the drug works in your body. If you drink alcohol and use Admelog together, you’re more likely to have low blood sugar.”

If you drink alcohol, talk to your doctor about the risks.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding while using Admelog

The safety of Admelog use during pregnancy isn’t clear. Studies of other medications containing insulin lispro (the active ingredient in Admelog*) did not show fetal harm when used during pregnancy. Insulin is often used to manage blood sugar levels in pregnant people with diabetes.

If you have diabetes or are pregnant, you should talk to your doctor.

If you don’t have diabetes, it’s still possible to develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy or pregestational diabetes before becoming pregnant. Your doctor can give you more information on how to prevent gestational diabetes before and during pregnancy.

It is not known if it is safe to breast feed while being treated with Admelog. If you are going to be breastfeeding, you should talk to your doctor about the safety of this drug. They can help you figure out the safest way to feed your child.

An active ingredient is what makes a drug work.

Admelog is a prescription drug used to help manage blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes. Admelog may have side effects. Mild and manageable, but serious side effects can occur.

“Questions about Admelog’s side effects can be answered by your doctor or pharmacist. Below are some questions you may want to ask during your treatment.”

  • Do people using Admelog for type 1 diabetes have different side effects than people using it for type 2 diabetes?
  • Is there any factor that can increase my risk of side effects?
  • Do children have a higher risk of side effects than adults?

For more information and resources, you can sign up for our type 2 diabetes newsletter. You can also find support and advice from our Bezzy type 2 diabetes community.

Q:

Can I have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) as a side effect of Admelog and not have any symptoms?

Anonymous

A:

In some cases, you can have low blood sugar during Admelog treatment and not have any symptoms. Your symptoms may be mild.

Certain drugs can reduce or mask the symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include clonidine and certain blood pressure medications called beta-blockers.

Due to this risk, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels during your treatment. And be sure to tell your doctor about any other drugs you take before starting Admelog.

If you have low blood sugar, you should talk to your doctor. They can give you advice on how to manage it, when to inject Admelog, and when to consider low blood sugar.

The Healthline Pharmacist TeamAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.