If you’ve been thinking about treatment options for opioid dependence, your doctor may discuss Zubsolv with you.

It’s used as part of a treatment program to manage opioid dependence in adults. This condition is now called opioid use disorder by healthcare professionals. Zubsolv is prescribed along with behavioral therapy, such as counseling.

Opioids are a group of medications used to treat moderate to severe pain. But with long-term use, they may lead to dependence and addiction. (With dependence, your body needs a drug in order for you to feel normal. And with addiction, a drug is taken, even if it’s causing harmful outcomes.)

For more information about opioid dependence and how Zubsolv is used, see the “What is Zubsolv used for?” section below.

Zubsolv basics

The tablets that are called ubsolv are dissolved under your tongue. It is a combination of two active ingredients.

  • buprenorphine, which is a weak opioid
  • Opioid antagonists are drugs that block the production of opioids.

Zubsolv is a brand-name drug. There isn’t a generic form of Zubsolv. But buprenorphine and naloxone are each available separately as a generic drug.

In this article we will discuss questions about Zubsolv, its side effects, and other information.

Zubsolv and Suboxone are both prescription drugs that contain the same active ingredients: buprenorphine and naloxone.

Both Zubsolv and Suboxone are used to manage opioid dependence. They’re both used together with behavioral therapies, such as counseling. (With dependence, your body needs a drug in order for you to feel normal.)

These medications can not be used interchangeably. If your doctor is going to switch you from one to the other, they will follow a certain schedule to make sure you handle it well.

Zubsolv and Suboxone are considered to be equally effective. But studies have shown that Zubsolv dissolves faster in your mouth and has a better taste compared with Suboxone.

For a detailed comparison of these drugs, see the “Suboxone vs. Zubsolv” section of this drug article. And talk with your doctor about the benefits of using either Zubsolv or Suboxone.

Find out what the answers are to some questions.

Will stopping Zubsolv make me have withdrawal symptoms?

Yes, it’s possible to have withdrawal symptoms after stopping Zubsolv. (Withdrawal refers to symptoms that occur when you stop taking a drug that your body is dependent on.) To help avoid withdrawal from Zubsolv, your doctor will discuss how you should slowly stop taking the medication. To do this, they’ll have you taper (slowly reduce) your dose over a certain length of time.

How long your doctor recommends the cessation of Zubsolv depends on your situation.

  • personal factors, such as how your overall treatment course with Zubsolv and behavioral therapy is going
  • How are you feeling with the lower doses of Zubsolv?

vomiting, sweating, and feeling unwell can be symptoms of withdrawal. The severity of symptoms may be determined by:

  • How long have you been taking it?
  • The amount of Zubsolv you are taking.
  • other individual factors, including:
    • other health conditions you may have, such as anxiety
    • How your body responds to lower doses of Zubsolv.

“If your Zubsolv dosage is too low, you may have withdrawal symptoms. It is important that you don’t stop taking Zubsolv unless your doctor prescribes it. Follow your doctor’s instructions for the end of the drug. If you feel like you are experiencing symptoms of withdrawal, talk to your doctor.”

Should you take Zubsolv by snorting it?

“You shouldn’t snort it. This medication is tablets. It is supposed to be taken by dissolving the tablets under your tongue.”

“It is important that you don’t misuse Zubsolv by taking it in a way that it isn’t meant to be taken. You should not crush the tablets. Doing these things can cause you to have withdrawal symptoms from the drug.”

Staying on track with your treatment plan is helped by taking Zubsolv exactly as your doctor prescribes.

How long does Zubsolv stay in your system?

buprenorphine and naloxone are active ingredients in Zubsolv. Each of these active ingredients stays in your system for a different amount of time.

Half of a buprenorphine dose can be cleared from your body within a day or two. Half of the dose is cleared from your body in 12 hours. For a few days or even a few weeks, Zubsolv may stay in your system.

How long you have Zubsolv in your system varies.

  • The amount of Zubsolv you are taking.
  • other health conditions you may have, such as liver disease
  • You are taking any other medications.

Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about how long Zubsolv lasts.

Is Zubsolv used to treat pain?

Zubsolv is only approved to treat opioid dependence. (With dependence, your body needs a drug in order for you to feel normal.) Although certain opioids may be prescribed to treat pain, Zubsolv is not approved for treating pain.

But Zubsolv contains the opioid buprenorphine. Sometimes, buprenorphine is prescribed off-label for pain. With off-label use, a medication is prescribed for a reason, or at a dose other than those for which it’s approved.

It is important to note that Zubsolv is not a strong pain-reliever. If it is used off-label, it may not be covered by your insurance plan.

If you want to learn more about using Zubsolv for pain, you should talk to your doctor.

Does Zubsolv cause weight gain?

You may gain some weight while taking the drug. It is not clear if Zubsolv causes weight gain.

The drug may lead to changes to your lifestyle, such as eating a balanced diet. And this could contribute to weight gain. Additionally, one study showed that people taking buprenorphine and naloxone experienced weight gain. (The active ingredients in Zubsolv are buprenorphine and naloxone.)

Keep in mind that a possible side effect of Zubsolv is peripheral edema (swelling in your hands and lower legs). And peripheral edema causes your body to hold more fluid than usual. This side effect may cause weight gain for a short period of time.

Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about weight gain with using Zubsolv. They can suggest ways to keep your weight in check while you take Zubsolv. Let your doctor know if you notice swelling while taking Zubsolv.

Your doctor will recommend the dosage of Zubsolv that’s right for you. Below are commonly used dosages, but always take the dosage your doctor prescribes.

Form and strengths

When you put the tablets under your tongue, they will break.

Buprenorphine and naloxone are active drugs in this medication. It is available in six strengths.

  • buprenorphine and naloxone have different amounts.
  • buprenorphine and naloxone are both used for opiate addiction.
  • buprenorphine and naloxone have different levels of active ingredients.
  • Both buprenorphine and naloxone have a maximum strength of 1.4 grams.
  • Both buprenorphine and naloxone have a high level of opiate content.
  • Both buprenorphine and naloxone have a maximum of 2 grams of each.

Recommended dosages

The doctor will prescribe the correct amount of Zubsolv for you.

  • How bad is your condition?
  • which type of opioids (either short-acting or long-acting) you were taking
  • You are taking any other medications.
  • Are you going to switch to another treatment medication?

Zubsolv treatment phases

Treatment with Zubsolv involves two phases.

  • The beginning phase of treatment is called irrmidation.
  • The continuation phase of treatment is maintenance.

The phase is called the insturment phase.

During the induction phase, your Zubsolv dosage is managed so that you don’t experience There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs. as your body adjusts to Zubsolv. Your doctor will monitor your treatment progress carefully during this phase.

The phase lasts for 3 days. Your doctor will decide how long your phase should last.

Sometimes a medication other than Zubsolv is used. Buprenorphine is a drug that is usually used. It is worth noting that Zubsolv contains both buprenorphine and naloxone. This type of drug can be used to reduce the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

The maintenance phase is over.

You will begin the maintenance phase of the treatment after you complete the induction phase.

The lowest dose of Zubsolv will help you with treatment and prevent the symptoms of opiate withdrawal. How long maintenance treatment lasts depends on how you are doing. Your doctor will give you a time limit for treatment.

Taking Zubsolv with other therapies

Your doctor will recommend other therapies to support your treatment progress during treatment with Zubsolv. Other therapies may include:

Questions about Zubsolv’s dosing

There are many questions about the drug.

  • What if I miss a dose of Zubsolv? To avoid side effects, such as There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs., it’s important to take Zubsolv exactly as it’s prescribed for you. If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. But if it’s close to your next regular dose, just skip the missed dose. Don’t take two doses of Zubsolv at once. Doing so can increase your risk for side effects.
  • Will I need to use Zubsolv long term? Maybe. How long you’ll need to take Zubsolv depends on how you’re doing with the treatment. Your doctor and counselor will monitor your progress and discuss your treatment goals with you on a regular basis. Your treatment will be individually tailored to help you have long-term success. Ask your doctor and therapist about the benefits and risks of long-term Zubsolv use.
  • How long does Zubsolv take to work? Zubsolv starts to work to help curb opioid cravings and withdrawal symptoms soon after you take a dose. Your doctor will explain the phases of Zubsolv treatment so you’ll know what to expect during each phase.
  • Is there a best time of day to take Zubsolv? There’s no specific time of day that’s best to take Zubsolv. But taking this drug around the same time each day helps to keep a steady level of the drug in your body. This helps Zubsolv work effectively.

“Your doctor will explain how to take the drug. They will explain how much to take and how often. Follow your doctor’s instructions.”

Taking Zubsolv

You place the tablets under your tongue. The tablets can be dissolved within 1 or 2 minutes.

If you are taking more than one pill, put them in different places under your tongue.

After taking each dose, swallow some water around your teeth and gums. Do not brush your teeth for an hour after taking Zubsolv. These things help make sure you take your full dose.

Questions about taking Zubsolv

We answer some questions about taking a drug.

  • Can Zubsolv be chewed, crushed, or split? No, don’t chew, crush, or split Zubsolv tablets. Doing these things may change how the medication works in your body. And it may cause you to have There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs..
  • Should I take Zubsolv with food? No. You shouldn’t drink or eat anything until after a Zubsolv tablet dissolves under your tongue. Avoiding food and beverages during this time will help ensure that you get your full dose of Zubsolv.

Questions for your doctor

You may have questions about your treatment. Discuss your concerns with your doctor.

Here are a few tips that might help you.

  • Before your appointment, write down questions like:
    • How will Zubsolv affect my life?
  • Bring someone with you to your appointment to make you feel more comfortable.
  • “If you don’t understand something, ask your doctor to explain it.”

“Your doctor and other healthcare professionals are available to help you. They want you to get the best care possible. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or give feedback on your treatment”

Mild or serious side effects may occur with Zubsolv. Some of the more common side effects of Zubsolv are described in the lists below. All possible side effects are not included in these lists.

Side effects of a drug can depend on other factors.

  • Your age.
  • The dose of the drug.
  • You have other health conditions.
  • You may be taking other drugs.

The doctor or the pharmacy can tell you more about the side effects of Zubsolv. They can suggest ways to reduce side effects.

Mild side effects

Here’s a short list of some of the mild side effects that Zubsolv can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Zubsolv’s prescribing information.

There are some mild side effects of Zubsolv that have been reported.

Many drugs can have mild side effects that go away in a few days or weeks. If they become intolerable, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

The side effect focus section gives more information on this side effect.

Serious side effects

There are serious side effects from Zubsolv, but they are not common. If you have serious side effects from Zubsolv, you should call your doctor. If you think you have a medical emergency, you should call the emergency number.

There have been serious side effects of Zubsolv.

The side effect focus section gives more information on this side effect.

Side effect focus

Learn about the side effects of Zubsolv.

Constipation

Zubsolv can cause constipation. In fact, during studies, this was a common side effect of the drug.

Symptoms of irritable bowels may include:

  • There were less bowel movements in a week.
  • After the bowel movements, you feel a lot of food in your belly.
  • Difficult passing stool
  • The pain during bowel movements is real.

What can help?

If you have constipation with Zubsolv, increasing the amount of fiber in your diet and drinking plenty of water can help.

In some cases, your doctor may also suggest over-the-counter or prescription medications to treat the constipation. Be sure to always check with your doctor before taking any medications for constipation.

Tiredness

Medications that contain an opioid can cause tiredness or lethargy (a feeling of sluggishness). And Zubsolv contains the opioid buprenorphine.

Feeling tired or having lethargy can be symptoms of CNS depression, which is a possible serious side effect of Zubsolv. (With CNS depression, your brain activity is slowed.) The risk of CNS depression varies depending on your dose of Zubsolv, how long you’ve taken the drug, and the severity of your opioid dependence.

What can help?

If you are not familiar with how Zubsolv affects you, be careful with any tasks that require you to be alert.

If you feel unwell, have breathing problems, or feel extremely tired, you should call the emergency number. Someone can take you to the nearest emergency room.

Headache

Taking Zubsolv may cause headaches. This was a common reaction in people who took the drug during studies.

What can help?

If you have headaches that are bothersome during Zubsolv treatment, talk with your doctor. They can recommend safe options to treat your headache. But don’t take any medications for headaches with Zubsolv without first talking with your doctor.

Allergic reaction

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Zubsolv.

A mild allergic reaction can include some symptoms.

  • There is a skin rash.
  • It is itchy.
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is not uncommon. A severe allergic reaction can cause swelling under your skin, which can be seen in your eyes, lips, hands, and feet. They can include swelling of your mouth, throat, and tongue, which can cause breathing problems.

If you have an allergic reaction to Zubsolv, call your doctor. If you think you have a medical emergency, call the emergency number.

Let your doctor know if you have any health issues. If you have a problem with the bile duct, it is important to tell them. Let them know about your over-the-counter products.

Here are some warnings and interactions you should know about.

Interactions

Taking medications, vaccines, foods, and other things with a certain drug can affect how the drug works. These effects are called interactions.

Before you take Zubsolv, be sure to tell your doctor about all your medication. You should also describe any vitamins, herbs, or supplements you use. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you about any interactions that may occur.

Interactions with drugs or supplements

The drugs that can be interacted with are listed below.

  • Opioids. Examples of opioids include hydrocodone, morphine, and oxycodone. Zubsolv contains the opioid drug buprenorphine. Taking other opioids with Zubsolv can increase your risk for side effects and opioid overdose.
  • Benzodiazepines and other central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs. Zubsolv is a type of drug called a CNS depressant. Examples of benzodiazepines and other CNS depressants include alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem, certain muscle relaxers, and medications for insomnia. Taking these medications together with Zubsolv can increase your risk for It is not good to be drowsiness., sedation, CNS depression, and Zubsolv overdose.
  • Macrolide antibiotics and antifungals. An example of these antibiotics is clarithromycin. Examples of antifungals include ketoconazole and fluconazole. Taking any of these medications with Zubsolv can increase buprenorphine levels in your body. (Buprenorphine is one of the active drugs in Zubsolv.) And this increases your risk for side effects from Zubsolv. If you need to take any of these medications with Zubsolv, your doctor will lower your Zubsolv dosage until you finish treatment with the other medication.
  • Certain types of antidepressants. Examples of these antidepressant drugs include venlafaxine and fluoxetine. These types of drugs increase levels of a brain chemical called serotonin. And this may lead to a dangerous condition called serotonin syndrome, which causes high blood pressure, tremors, There is confusion., fast heartbeat, and seizures. If you need to take certain types of antidepressants with Zubsolv, your doctor will monitor you closely for serotonin syndrome.
  • Certain types of seizure medications. Certain seizure medications, including carbamazepine and phenytoin, can lower the amount of Zubsolv in your body. This can make Zubsolv less effective, and can also increase your risk of There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs.. If you need to take certain types of seizure medications, your doctor may adjust your Zubsolv dosage. And they’ll monitor you closely for There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs..
  • Certain types of diuretic medications. Diuretics, also called water pills, include furosemide, spironolactone, and hydrochlorothiazide. Taking diuretics with Zubsolv can make diuretics less effective and increase your risk of high blood pressure and swelling. If you need to take a diuretic with Zubsolv, your doctor may increase your diuretic dosage. They’ll also monitor you closely for symptoms such as swelling and high blood pressure while you’re taking Zubsolv.

Some drugs that may interact with Zubsolv are not on this list. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about the interactions that may occur with use of Zubsolv.

Warnings

If you have a medical condition that affects your health, you may not be a good choice for ubsolv. Talk to your doctor about your health history. The factors to consider are listed below.

  • Liver disease or liver damage. If you have serious problems with your liver, Zubsolv may not be right for you. With certain liver conditions, you may have serious side effects from Zubsolv, including There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs.. And buprenorphine (one of the active drugs in Zubsolv) can cause liver problems, such as hepatitis (inflammation in your liver). If you have liver problems or you’ve had them in the past, let your doctor know. They’ll recommend if Zubsolv is safe for you.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Zubsolv or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Zubsolv. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Breathing problems. If you have serious lung conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Zubsolv may increase your risk for breathing trouble. This is because the drug can cause slowed or shallow breathing. Let your doctor know if you have lung problems before you start using Zubsolv. Doing so can help you to avoid serious problems while you’re taking Zubsolv.
  • Head injury or brain tissue damage. One of the active drugs in Zubsolv, called buprenorphine, may increase pressure inside your head, which could lead to permanent brain damage. If you’ve had any head injuries or brain damage, talk with your doctor to see if Zubsolv is a safe option for you.
  • Bile duct damage or disease. One of the active drugs in Zubsolv, called buprenorphine, may increase pressure inside your bile duct tract. (Your bile duct tract is an area of your body that includes your gallbladder and liver.) If you have a history of bile duct damage or other problems, talk with your doctor to see if Zubsolv is a safe option for you.
  • Intestinal damage or disease. Constipation is a common side effect of Zubsolv. If you already have problems with your intestines, you may have a higher risk for constipation with Zubsolv. Talk with your doctor about whether Zubsolv is safe for you to take if you have intestinal damage or other problems.
  • Heart problems. If you have or are at a high risk of heart problems, Zubsolv may increase your risk of long QT syndrome (abnormal electrical activity in your heart). If you already have a heart condition or a condition that increases your risk of heart problems, your doctor will likely monitor you for any heart problems while you’re taking Zubsolv. These conditions include hypokalemia, bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure. Talk with your doctor about your medical history before you start taking Zubsolv.

Use with alcohol

You shouldn’t drink alcohol while you’re taking Zubsolv. Drinking alcohol while you’re taking Zubsolv can increase your risk for serious or life threatening side effects, including CNS depression. Symptoms of depression in the central nervous system can include:

Also, in some cases, drinking alcohol while using Zubsolv can lead to death. This is because both Zubsolv and alcohol can cause central nervous system (CNS) depression. (With CNS depression, your brain activity is slowed.)

You may want to ask your doctor about the risks of drinking alcohol while using Zubsolv.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Talk to your doctor about whether you should take a drug while pregnant.

Zubsolv use while pregnant

Using Zubsolv during pregnancy may cause the fetus to develop neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS). With NOWS, the baby is dependent on opioids, which means their body needs opioids in order for them to feel normal.

After birth, your baby will be monitored if you used Zubsolv during your pregnancies. The hospital may be where NOWS treatment is given.

NOWS can have symptoms.

  • There is a lot of diarrhea.
  • “Is it possible that I’m Irrisponsible?”
  • excessive crying
  • “It’s difficult to sleep.”
  • There was no weight gain.

If you are pregnant, talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking Zubsolv. While using Zubsolv increases the risk of NOWS, having a drug problem can be harmful to a pregnant woman.

Zubsolv use while breastfeeding

Breast milk contains ubsolv. If you are taking Zubsolv, be sure to ask your doctor if it is safe to breast feed. If you decide to breast feed your child will need to be monitored for signs of overdose. These symptoms can be seen.

  • breathing problems
  • The lips or mouth is blue.
  • excessive sleep.

If your child has any of these symptoms, you should call the emergency number.

Recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists state that most females* having treatment for opioid use disorder with a medication such as Zubsolv should breastfeed their children if they wish to do so. But there are some exceptions to this guidance, so be sure to talk with your doctor about it.

Talk to your doctor about the risks of breastfeeding while you take Zubsolv. They can tell you if you should consider other feeding options.

* In this article, we use the term “female” to refer to someone’s sex assigned at birth. For information about the difference between sex and gender, see this article.

There are many factors that affect the cost of prescription drugs. What your insurance plan covers is one of the factors.

If you have questions about how to pay for your prescription, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. You can also visit the Zubsolv manufacturer’s website to see if it offers any support options.

If you’ve been considering treatment for opioid dependence, your doctor may discuss Zubsolv treatment with you.

Zubsolv is used as part of a treatment program to manage opioid dependence in adults. It’s prescribed along with behavioral therapy, including counseling and support programs. This complete treatment program helps to increase long-term success with treatment.

Opioids are a group of medications used to manage moderate to severe pain. But with long-term use, they may cause drug dependence and addiction. (With dependence, your body needs a drug in order for you to feel normal. And with addiction, a drug is taken, even if it’s causing harmful outcomes.)

A partial agonist-antagonist drug is called ubsolv. It also blocks the effects of opioids.

The drugs in Zubsolv help manage dependence on the opiate.

  • Buprenorphine, which is a weak opioid. It works to reduce your opioid cravings and lower your risk for There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs. after you stop taking opioids.
  • Naloxone, which is an opioid antagonist. It works to block the effects of opioids in your body. This helps prevent misuse of Zubsolv, which means you take it in a way other than how it’s prescribed for you. For example, if you crush Zubsolv tablets rather than taking them whole as directed, naloxone is released. Naloxone blocks the effects of buprenorphine, leading to There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs..

You’ll start Zubsolv treatment with an induction phase, which typically lasts for 3 days. This phase lets your body become used to Zubsolv. After this phase, your doctor will adjust your Zubsolv dosing for the remainder of treatment, which is called the maintenance phase. For more information, see the “How is Zubsolv taken?” section above.

Do not take more than your doctor prescribes. Side effects can be serious if you use more than this.

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms caused by a overdose of Zubsolv can be found.

What to do in case you take too much Zubsolv

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much Zubsolv. You can also call 800-222-1222 to reach the American Association of Poison Control Centers or use its online resource. But if you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 (or your local emergency number) or go to the nearest emergency room.

Note: If your doctor recommends that you take Zubsolv for opioid dependence, you should also talk with your doctor or pharmacist about using naloxone (Narcan) for treating opioid overdose. A friend or family member can be trained to give doses of naloxone in case you have an overdose while you’re taking Zubsolv. (For more information about opioid dependence, see the “What is Zubsolv used for?” section above.)

There is a risk of misuse with the drug. Misuse happens when you take the drug in a way that is not prescribed for you. It also means taking a drug that is prescribed for someone else.

Zubsolv is used to treat opioid dependence in adults. (With dependence, your body needs a drug in order for you to feel normal.) Zubsolv acts like a weak opioid in your body. It helps manage opioid cravings and There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs.. But it doesn’t give you a feeling of euphoria or of being “high.”

If you change your dose or take it alone, it is considered misuse of the drug. Misuse of Zubsolv may increase your risk of serious side effects.

Misuse happens when you take the drug in a way that is not prescribed for you.

Naloxone is an opiate antagonist and is contained in Zubsolv. It blocks the effects of drugs in your body.

So if you crush Zubsolv tablets rather than taking them whole as directed, naloxone is released. Naloxone blocks the effects of buprenorphine, leading to There are symptoms of withdrawal from drugs..

Take it as your doctor prescribes it. Doing so helps your treatment to be successful. Your doctor will discuss the risks of misuse with you.

Before starting treatment with Zubsolv, talk with your doctor to learn more about opioid dependence and how Zubsolv can help treat it. (With dependence, your body needs a drug in order for you to feel normal.)

Ask your doctor what to expect with the drug.

Your doctor may discuss other treatment options available for your condition. And they can tell you about Support groups. and behavioral therapies, such as counseling and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Here are a few questions you might want to ask your doctor.

  • “How soon will I know if it’s working?”
  • Will I experience withdrawal when I start using the drug?
  • What if I have a serious allergic reaction to Zubsolv?
  • What supplements are safe to take with Zubsolv?

To learn more about opioid addiction, stigma, and withdrawal symptoms, read Healthline’s overview article on this topic.

Q:

Can I take Lomotil for There is a lot of diarrhea. while I’m taking Zubsolv?

Anonymous

A:

Some people may not be safe taking Lomotil with Zubsolv.

Both Lomotil and Zubsolv can cause central nervous system (CNS) depression as a side effect. (With CNS depression, your brain activity is slowed.) So taking these medications together can increase your risk for this side effect, which can be serious.

Symptoms of depression in the central nervous system can include:

  • Slow heart rate.
  • It is not good to be drowsiness.
  • There is confusion.
  • lethargy (feeling sluggish)
  • slurred speech
  • There is lack of coordination.

If you’re having There is a lot of diarrhea. with Zubsolv, call your doctor. They can recommend a product that’s safe for you to take with Zubsolv. And they can recommend whether it’s safe for you to take Lomotil with Zubsolv.

“Don’t take other medications without first talking with your doctor, while taking Zubsolv. They can recommend a treatment that is safe for you to take. You should keep in mind that other drugs may affect your risk for side effects.”

The Healthline Pharmacist TeamAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.